My introduction to clay started as a young boy making figurines on the floor of my mothers’ Potters Studio. She has been a big inspiration to me in the field of clay as well as life in general.

I renewed my acquaintance with clay three years ago and fell in love all over again.

This time round I got inspired by the infinite  possibilities and complexities that the Japanese art of Nerikomi brings to the potters table.

I started looking into Nerikomi and the art of coloured clay about a few years ago and got instantly hooked and fascinated by the possibilities and complexity that this art form offered. Nerikomi, a ceramic technique for coloured porcelain, is a unique fusion of colour, pattern and form.  The Japanese name translates from “neri,” meaning “kneading,” and “komi,” meaning “into”—describing the process: pigments are mixed into wet clay, integrating the color throughout rather than painting it onto the surface.  Different coloured clays are layered and compressed to construct a solid block with a pattern running through the inside.  Ranging from simple stripes to marbled swirls to intricate images, the design is revealed when the block is sliced in a cross section.  These pieces of patterned clay can be shaped and formed to create pottery or sculpture with striking visual effects that could not be achieved using any other technique. The use of coloured clay goes as far back as 7000 years to the Egyptians. There are slight differences of application in different cultures. I chose to follow the Japanese tradition.  My recent work explore the possibilities of coloured clay slips.

Transparent glaze is used to brighten and highlight colour of the clay and for functional purposes.

My work explore the beauty of nature in the abstract form introducing pattern and colour with clay as my canvas. I  explore the delicate and thin possibilities that Porcelain offer the ceramic artist contrasting with my stoneware work which is more heavy and bulky as the medium require. 

Ceramicists collection address:
Pretoria
GP
0181

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